First trip to fabric store. Came home with ninja headbands and ponytail ribbons. Much fun had by all.

First trip to fabric store. Came home with ninja headbands and ponytail ribbons. Much fun had by all.

micdotcom:

“Pink is just a color:” How one Seattle mom and her sons are destroying gender stereotypes

"Some boys like pink, and why not? Pink is just a color, and so is green, and blue, and yellow. No child should be teased for what they wear," she wrote on her Facebook page. 

Marketing of gender-conforming colors and toys, like blue and pink aisles in kids’ stores or the gender-specific doll and action hero options in fast food meals, can seem inescapable. But the positive response to Zoer’s campaign on social media suggests change is coming — or at the very least, that parents are becoming more aware of the issue.

How you can get involved

I love this of course.

(via sweetuncompromisingview)

"I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough."

Important advice from Ira Glass. (via annfriedman)

crazy70s:

New Words Feminist Bookstore in Cambridge, MA. 1976


This.

crazy70s:

New Words Feminist Bookstore in Cambridge, MA. 1976

This.

(via mamamusement)

My boy and girl at Tippy Toes together today. How much am I enjoying that they’re both into it? Let me count the ways. Gotcha, #gender!

Tags: gender

"Imagine how different things might be if, instead of giving parents a bad rap, we viewed it as our communal responsibility to make sure everyone raising children had the time and resources to do it well. I can think of countless measures that could help, such as giving parents some paid time off from work that they could use to meet with a teacher or take a child to a doctor’s visit or counseling appointment. Or, what if more employers offered flexible (or at least predictable) schedules, which would make it easier for working parents to put a reliable childcare plan in place? With National Parents’ Day coming on July 27, I can’t think of a better way to honor Dajae’s memory and all those we have lost to gun violence than for us to start practicing what we preach about the importance of parental involvement and take the steps necessary to truly make it possible."

Rhonda Present, Good parenting alone isn’t enough to prevent violence - Chicago Sun-Times

"As I stared at the message on my cell phone, I was overwhelmed with grief for the tragic loss of yet another young person with so much promise. And, I was struck by the realization that even though it is my responsibility to keep her safe, I cannot shield my daughter from the random acts of violence that have profoundly touched my life and now hers."

-Rhonda Present, Good parenting alone isn’t enough to prevent violence - Chicago Sun-Times

(via (M)others: Good, Bad, Real » Girl w/ Pen)
"What’s clear is that mothers are caught between more than just the polarizations of “good” and “bad.” There’s joy and hardship, fury and sweetness, days of spiraling despair and moments of unbridled amazement. Judgment lurks behind every corner, and some days it’s the self in the mirror who seems to be casting the sharpest glance. As the phrase “good mother” is turned over and over, its meaning becomes more porous and latticed by nuance."

-Elline Lipkin, (M)others: Good, Bad, Real » Girl w/ Pen

Choreographing our own dance while listening to Jutta and the Hi-Dukes #evanstonethnicartsfestival